society


I’m currently reading through “The Year of Living Like Jesus”- My journey of discovering what Jesus would really do – by Ed Dobson.  He wrote the book after hearing A.J. Jacobs on NPR talking about his book “The Year of Living Biblically”.

So far I’ve been struck by a couple things.  First, Dobson brings up the outrage some in the Christian community express when a courthouse or other public place refuses to display the Ten Commandments.  He thinks it somewhat humorous that petitions would be signed and marches organized, when most every Christian breaks one of the Ten Commandments every week – the whole “keeping the Sabbath” thing.  Is that a valid point?  Are we just cherry picking the Commandments that are easiest to keep?  Shouldn’t we be more concerned with keeping the Ten Commandments instead of displaying them?

Secondly, prayers and liturgy.  I’ve kinda grown up thinking that all prayers should be spontaneous and free-flowing, otherwise it wasn’t really me talking to God.  I didn’t often read a prayer, write a prayer or much less recite an ancient prayer.  Dobson addresses this when after growing up with said “free-flowing prayers…I soon realized that most people generally said the same thing over and over again.  Even though we were against liturgical prayers, our free-flowing prayers ended up being pretty liturgical themselves.”

I’ve really enjoyed the last couple years at Vox Dei and stepping out of a comfort zone I didn’t really know I had.  There is something about the liturgy and ancient prayers that calms me and reminds me that I don’t have it all figured out.  I don’t have all the right things to say.  Millions of people for hundreds of years have said the same prayers and they didn’t have it all figured out.  There is a measure of freedom in that.

 I humbly concede that I do not have it all figured out by any means, but I do appreciate an article that will look at research articles from both sides while holding to the premise that this is not a black and white issue.

 

There was big news last week in the heated debate about whether childhood vaccines cause autism. The 1998 study in The Lancet, which largely launched the vaccine-autism imbroglio, has been officially retracted. Its lead author, Dr. Andrew Wakefield, has also been discredited by Britain’s independent regulator of doctors for his “unethical” and “dishonest” actions in conducting the pulled study.

But Wakefield’s deeply flawed paper is not the only study that has fueled the anti-vaccination movement. Led by celebrities such as Jenny McCarthy, the movement continues to vehemently oppose mainstream science’s overwhelming consensus that vaccines do not cause developmental disorders.

Some of these papers championed by the anti-vaccination camp have serious problems of their own. Others muddy the waters or hint at conspiratorial efforts by governmental health organizations and vaccine-profiteering pharmaceutical companies to hide the truth about autism’s genesis.

Here’s a look at several of the key studies that the anti-vaccination movement has either embraced or lambasted in furthering its perspective. These studies have already fueled the controversy and will likely remain at the epicenter of future clashes over vaccine safety

Continue reading full article 

http://www.popularmechanics.com/science/health_medicine/4345610.html?page=1

Impressive video

You ever accidentally tell the wrong family their loved one just died?  So last night in the ER, we had two patients come in about the same time, both of the same gender and nationality, but maybe 30 years apart in age.

Patient A, roughly a 70 year old female, was here for cardio-pulmonary arrest (heart and lungs stopped working for some reason).  Patient B, a 40 year old female, was here for low back pain, although she did have some sort of cancer.

Patient A ended up dying despite our best efforts to save her.  The ER doctor went out to the waiting room to break the bad news to the family.  Through a comedy of errors, patient B’s family was accidentally rounded up and prepared for the doctors announcement.  The doctor then double checked by asking “are you Mrs Patient A’s family?”.  They (incorrectly) replied “yes, we are”.  Well, imagine their surprise when they found out their family member died from a severe backache!

After much screaming, crying, gnashing of teeth, and tearing of clothes (literally), it was realized that their family member wasn’t dead, in fact, she was very much alive, although her back was still a little sore.  The doctor  had to then go find the correct family and tell them the bad news (this time he was much more polished from the previous delivery).

Not quite the ol’ amputating of the wrong leg during surgery, but pretty close!

Published: Jan. 11, 2009 at 3:07 PM

SILVERADO CANYON, Calif., Jan. 11 (UPI) — A California father says he discovered his 13-year-old daughter sent 484 text messages per day last month — one message every 2 minutes of every waking hour. 

Greg Hardesty of Silverado Canyon, Calif., told the New York Post his 440-page cell phone bill revealed his daughter Reina had sent an astonishing 14,528 text messages.

“First, I laughed. I thought, ‘That’s insane, that’s impossible,'” said Hardesty, 45, a reporter for The Orange County Register. “And I immediately whipped out the calculator to see if it was humanly possible.”

Hardesty said Reina had messaged a core of “four obsessive texters,” all girls between the ages of 12 and 13. Luckily, he was on an unlimited text messaging plan or his bill would have been $2,905 at a rate of 20 cents per message, the Post reported.

Hardesty told the newspaper he and his ex-wife have placed restrictions on Reina’s cellphone use, ruling she cannot text after dinner.

When it comes to texting, it appears Reina has much in common with a New Zealand teenager. It was reported last month that Hannah Brooke, 16, of Wellington frequently uses up the 6,000 messages she’s allowed each month and borrows phones from friends to keep on texting.

Rustin shared this at Vox this morning –

Every act of love, gratitude, and kindness; every work of art or music inspired by the love of God and delight in the beauty of his creation; every minute spent teaching a severely handicapped child to read or walk; every act of care and nurture, of comfort and support, for one’s fellow human beings and for that matter one’s fellow nonhuman creatures; and of course every prayer, all Spirit-led teaching, every deed that spreads the gospel, builds up the church, embraces and embodies holiness rather than corruption, and makes the name of Jesus honored in the world—all of this will find its way, through the resurrecting power of god, into the new creation that god will one day make. That is the logic of the mission of God. God’s recreation of his wonderful world, which began with the resurrection of Jesus and continues mysteriously as God’s people live in the risen Christ and in the power of his Spirit, means that what we do in Christ and by the Spirit in the present is not wasted. – N.T. Wright (Suprised by Hope)

“We are perishing for want of wonder, not for want of wonders.”  – G.K. Chesterton

Next Page »